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Date and time
Monday, April 8, 2019 - 18:00 to 19:30
Address
Beswick 017
Parkgate Road
Chester
Cheshire
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom

About the Event

Dr Melanie Giles, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, University of Manchester

Why have the well-preserved remains of Iron Age people found in bogs across north-western Europe, captivated the attention not just of archaeologists but poets, film-makers, philosophers and curators? In this lecture, I will explore remains from northern Britain, Ireland and Denmark, firstly from a mortuary perspective: examining what the forensic evidence can tell us about their lives and deaths.

New research on Lancashire's bog heads 'Worsley Man' and 'Ashton Man' will be presented alongside a richer understanding of the landscapes and legends of bogs and boggarts. The talk will also review some of the ethical issues surrounding their display and interpretation in museums. By critically considering the slight-of-hand performed by conservation strategies, I will explore how this final stage of their biography contributes to what Seamus Heaney memorably described as their ‘riddling power’.

About Dr Melanie Giles

Dr Giles grew up under the shadow of Hambledon Hillfort in Dorset, and became fascinated by the idea of exploring lives which were lived in ways very different to our own. She completed both a BA in Archaeology and MA in Landscape Archaeology, at the University of Sheffield, and developed an expertise in Iron Age studies. Dr Giles completed her PhD at the same institution on the Iron Age landscapes of East Yorkshire and is now a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Manchester. Her research draws together strands of the archaeology of identity and personhood, with studies of landscape and place, alongside material culture and art. Dr Giles has pioneered the entwined study of human and object biographies through the lens of mortuary archaeology. This has led to an increased interest in the Iron Age life-course, particularly incidents of disease, injury and violence, and how these life-events as well as the circumstances of death, were dealt with through the funerary rite.

This public lecture is part of the University's Research Festival

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Directions

Address

Beswick 017
Parkgate Road
Chester
Cheshire
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom