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Date and time
Thursday, April 30, 2020 - 18:30
Address
Parkgate Road
Chester
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom

About the Event

Event Postponed – Please note that this event has now been postponed and will no longer take place on this date. Further information will be made available once a new date is confirmed, please check back for updates.

Many thanks, Corporate Communications.

Professorial Inaugural Lecture - Professor Tessa Smith

Ensuring good welfare for both wild and captive animals is essential not only from an ethical standpoint but also to ensure valid scientific research and sustainable conservation outcomes. Captive animals with good welfare produce more reliable, biologically valid, robust, repeatable scientific data compared to their counterparts with poorer welfare.  ‘Happy’ animals live longer, can be used repeatedly and need replacing less often hence moving towards satisfaction of the 3Rs (refine, reduce and replace: the guiding principles for the use of animals in research).  In the wild, ‘happy’ animals have enhanced reproductive success, stronger immune function, sharper cognitive abilities and fine-tuned adaptive capabilities which favour survival amidst the challenges of the Anthropocene.

Tessa’s research develops novel non-invasive methods to quantify physiological levels of stress hormones excreted by animals across the taxon from fish to primates. Tessa uses these physiological tools in parallel with behavioural measures to assess and optimise animal welfare with the goal of improving animal subjective well-being (i.e. ‘happiness’).  The talk will critically explore Tessa’s development and application of these tools to assess animal welfare questions in wild populations (e.g. is there a link between stress and the spread of Tuberculosis in badgers? ) together with captive animals housed in zoos (e.g. does the presence of zoo visitors impact zoo animals?), farms (e.g. do commercial fish farming practises cause stress?), laboratories (e.g. does the presence of a social companion reduce the negative impact of routine husbandry practices?), domestic settings (e.g. is behaviour a reliable indicator of stress in horses?) and semi-free ranging environments (e.g. is social stress a problem for semi-managed endangered primates?).  Tessa’s research collaborations span the globe and have resulted in over 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals.

 

Tessa Smith is a Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Chester.

Free tea and coffee will be served in the foyer from 6pm.

Venue: Beswick Lecture Theatre 017, Parkgate Road, University of Chester, CH1 4BJ

Admission: Free, booking required. Please email events@chester.ac.uk.

Directions

Address

Parkgate Road
Chester
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom