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Date and time
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 13:00 to 14:00
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 13:00 to 14:00
Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 13:00 to 14:00
Address
Grosvenor Museum
Grosvenor Road
Chester
Cheshire
CH1 2DD
United Kingdom

About the Event

Uncovering Britain’s Lost Histories

Taking inspiration from Norbert Elias’ study of the ‘court society’ of Louis XIV at Versailles, this series of lectures will consider the power of the court in the Middle Ages. Through three case studies, we will investigate the size, composition, locations, environments, and material culture of medieval courts to see how ‘court societies’ were fostered..

Wednesday 4th March 2020: The hidden history of plants in the Stone Age

Dr Barry Taylor

We associate the early human past with the use of stone tools but it was plants that provided many of the materials of daily life. From nettle cord fishing lines or birch bark containers to elm bows and lime canoes, early prehistoric communities made
use of a wide range of plants, often using certain species for specific tasks. Plants were also important symbolically, and played an important role in ritual practices. In this lecture we will explore the lost world of plants as they were understood by
the communities living in Britain shortly after the end of the last Ice Age, as well as having the opportunity to carry out some plant-based crafts.

Wednesday 11th March 2020: Forgotten in Britain? Remembering the German Dead of the two World Wars

Professor Tim Grady

Almost 7,000 Germans – military and civilians – were laid to rest in Britain during the two World Wars. The British initially buried these dead in cemeteries scattered throughout the country, including in Chester. However, in the 1960s, the vast majority of bodies were reinterred in a new German cemetery in Staffordshire. This talk explores the changing place of the German war dead, tracing how their presence gradually faded from local memory.

Wednesday 18th March 2020: Change in a Historic Landscape: The Lost Buildings of Port Sunlight

Dr Rebecca Andrew

Founded in the 19th century by William Hesketh Lever, to house ‘Sunlight Soap’ factory workers, Port Sunlight is now a thriving tourist destination, containing 900 Grade II listed buildings. The village’s identity focuses on its supposedly unchanging nature, despite considerable development throughout its relatively short history. This talk concentrates on demolished, replaced or re-purposed ‘lost’ buildings over the past 125 years. Challenging common representations of Port
Sunlight, it questions the significance for tourists and residents alike.

Spring Series 2020

Wednesdays 1.00pm - 2.00pm (Admission from 12.30pm)

£3.00 per lecture or £6.00, in advance, for the full seriesPay on the door or send cheque/postal order (payable to 'University of Chester')  to  Lunchtime Lectures, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester CH1 4BJ. 

Enquiries:

Tel: 01244 512160   Email:  history.archaeology@chester.ac.uk

Directions

Address

Grosvenor Museum
Grosvenor Road
Chester
Cheshire
CH1 2DD
United Kingdom