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Date and time
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 16:00 to 17:30
Address
University of Chester Riverside Campus
Castle Drive
Chester
CH1 1SL
United Kingdom

About the Event

Dr Karen J. Egenes, Emerita Associate Professor, Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, Loyola University, Chicago​ and Board Member, American Association for the History of Nursing

At the inception of nursing education in the US, as in the UK, a school of nursing was typically attached to a hospital. Patient care was provided by student nurses who were educated through an apprenticeship system. However, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the opportunity to become a nurse in the US through a correspondence school was heralded as an innovation in nursing education. After payment of a substantial enrollment fee, a student received by mail a series of “lectures”; printed course materials that provided content about basic nursing skills, as well as nursing specialty areas such as obstetrical, and surgical nursing. The course materials were of high quality, illustrated with many photographs. This format appealed to individuals who aspired to a career in nursing but were unable to enroll in a traditional hospital training school.

The two most notable correspondence schools for nursing education were the Chautauqua School of Nursing, founded in Jamestown, New York in 1900 and the Chicago School of Nursing, founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1899 by Dr. Orville Juan Perkins. These schools grew rapidly through magazine advertisements that promised graduates salaries of $10.00 to $35.00 per week. Although the Chautauqua School closed in 1927, the Chicago School of Nursing endured until the 1950s.

The closing of correspondence schools of nursing resulted from recognition of the need for nursing students to have experiences with actual patients, and stricter regulations for nurse licensure. This presentation will discuss the schools’ goals, operations, and enduring legacies and it implications for contemporary nurse education.    

The University of Chester’s Faculty of Health and Social Care Historical Society aims to unite individuals with an interest in medicine, nursing, midwifery and social work across the University and the wider community. The Society meets regularly for a range of talks and discussion and anyone with an interest in health and social care or social history is welcome to attend.                                                                                                                       

Host: Faculty of Health and Social Care Historical Society

Admission free but booking necessary for seating and refreshment purposes (tea, coffee and cake will be provided).

Please contact fhsc.histsoc@chester.ac.uk or call 01244 512095 to confirm your place.

There is no car parking available at the Riverside Campus. Access to the lecture rooms is through the main entrance, opposite the River Dee. Further details on parking and transport options are available on our How to Find Us page.

The University of Chester Riverside Museum will also be open from 1-4pm, free admission and no booking necessary

Directions

Address

University of Chester Riverside Campus
Castle Drive
Chester
CH1 1SL
United Kingdom