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Date and time
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 18:30
Address
Parkgate Road
Chester
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom

About the Event

The figure of Judas Iscariot is synonymous with treachery and betrayal. As one of Jesus’ twelve disciples, he famously betrayed his master to the authorities with a kiss for thirty pieces of silver. His death is also one of the best known suicides in history. Filled with remorse for his actions, he hanged himself, which many ancient theologians such as Augustine believed added to his sin of betrayal.

But who was Judas? Did he really betray Jesus? If so, why? How should his suicide be interpreted? Indeed, did Judas exist at all? The early presentations of Judas in the four canonical gospels complicate the traditional image of this notorious character. The infamous kiss of betrayal appears only in Mark and Matthew’s gospels, while only John calls him a thief. Even on his iconic death the gospels diverge. Mark and John do not record it at all, while in the Acts of the Apostles, Luke says his death is the result of a fall. Only in Matthew does he hang himself, and it is not clear he interprets his suicide negatively. However, Judas’ betrayal is a pivotal point in the gospel narrative which leads to Jesus’ arrest, crucifixion, and ultimately, resurrection. Arguably, the Christian narrative of salvation required Judas’ actions.

Paul Middleton, Professor of New Testament and early Christian history, will explore the controversial figure of Judas Iscariot, examining early traditions and legends in the New Testament and other early Christian texts such as the Gospel of Judas. He will also look at more contemporary presentations in films such as the Passion of the Christ and Jesus Christ Superstar. Separating history from myth, Professor Middleton will ask how one of Jesus’ inner circle was transformed into one of the most notorious villains of all time.

Free tea and coffee served in the foyer from 6pm

 

Venue: Beswick Lecture Theatre, Parkgate Road, University of Chester, CH1 4BJ

Admission: Free, booking required. . Email events@chester.ac.uk

Directions

Address

Parkgate Road
Chester
CH1 4BJ
United Kingdom