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Course:

The history programme at Chester has skills embedded throughout the course and I particularly benefitted from the support of my tutors to develop my academic writing.

What are you doing now?

I currently wear a number of academic employment hats! I am in the second year of an AHRC funded PhD at the University of York researching late medieval probate inventories and household material culture. I also work part time as an administrator in the University of Chester’s Registry Services department, and, this year I have started work as a visiting lecturer in the department of History and Archaeology too. I am teaching an undergraduate module on rebellion and society in the later Middle Ages, a research project on late medieval wills and possessions, and academic skills sessions to help students improve their assessments.

What did you enjoy most about your history degree?

My favourite part of my time at Chester was the opportunity to conduct an independent research project as part of the second year Work Based Learning term. My research project analysed chests and coffers in a sample of late medieval wills. This project not only formed the basis for my MA thesis, which went on to win the Garmonsway Prize for the best dissertation submitted to York’s Centre for Medieval Studies that year, it also led to my interest late medieval material culture which underpins my current PhD research.

How did your degre prepare you for your current role?

The history programme at Chester has skills embedded throughout the course and I particularly benefitted from the support of my tutors to develop my academic writing. This skill serves me well as I continue my studies, but more than that, it is also incredibly transferable and has helped me to become an effective communicator across a number of mediums and in different employment contexts.