Skip to content

The history of migration to England in the late middle ages is the topic of a presentation by Mark Ormrod, Emeritus Professor at the University of York, who will be visiting the Department of History and Archaeology to share his knowledge and research.

Professor Ormrod has had a long, distinguished, and influential career researching and writing about later medieval English history. His latest project is called: ‘England’s immigrants 1330-1550: resident aliens in the late Middle Ages’ (www.englandsimmigrants.com). This has explored the archival evidence for the names, origins, occupations and households of foreign people who chose to make their lives and livelihoods in England. The archive contains over 64,000 names of people known to have migrated to England during the period of the Hundred Years’ War, and the Black Death, the Wars of the Roses and the Reformation. The majority are described as coming from European countries; there are also some references to ‘Indians’ too.

Professor Ormrod’s research, which is also helping to provide a deep historical and cultural context to contemporary debates over ethnicity, multiculturalism and national identity, has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Dr Katherine Wilson, Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Chester, said: “For anyone interested in the history of England or the history of immigration, this is an event that should not be missed. All are welcome to attend to hear about Professor Ormrod’s work, the result of which has revolutionised our understanding of the scale and circumstances of migration to England in this period.”

Professor Ormrod’s research has produced two new books: W. M. Ormrod, B. Lambert and J. Mackman, Immigrant England, 1300-1550 (Manchester, 2019) and W. M. Ormrod, N. McDonald and C. Taylor (eds), Resident Aliens in Later Medieval England (Turnhout, 2017).

Professor Mark Ormrod’s talk: ‘Immigration: An English Controversy, 1250-1500’ takes place on Wednesday December 5, at 2pm on the University of Chester’s Parkgate Road Campus, in the Beswick Building (Room CBE001/4 and 3). All are welcome, attendance is free with no need to book.

 

Share this content