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Research & Knowledge Transfer Festival Programme 2020

We are going Green!  As part of the University’s commitment to environmental sustainability, for sessions where catering is provided we will be operating a ‘bring your own cup’ policy and sandwich platters will be meat free.

Monday 27th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

10:00 – 11:00

Conducting & Supervising a PhD within an Open context

Dr Suzanne Stewart Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Bradley Kennedy – PhD Student, School of Psychology

The session aims to introduce a student’s experience of conducting a PhD within an Open Research context. Areas of discussion will include getting started, benefits, barriers, resources, and community.

The supervision of a PhD project in an open context will also be discussed from the experiences of a supervisor.

Who’s it for? University Staff, in particular, those who (currently or will) supervise PGR students, PGR Students, Students considering PhD Programmes

What will you gain? Attendees will hear the experiences of conducting and supervising research in an open research context. In hearing about these experiences, they may inform attendees’ decisions about their own practices in conducting doctoral work and in supervision.

The experiences may also help prospective PhD students make their decisions about conducting open research.

For current PGR students, attending this workshop may help illuminate some of open research practices and help them to understand how they can incorporate some of these practices/methods into their own research, even if the PhD is already underway.

Attendees will also gain familiarity with the Chester Open Research Alliance, the University’s own community of individuals who engage with open research practices.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D1

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality of Education) 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

CHRITCHLEY

CCR014

Book Here
11:00 – 13:00

Managing your references- an introduction to using Endnote Bibliographic Management Software Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

Struggling to organise your citations? This session will show people new to using referencing management systems how to use Endnote software to create, manage, update and work with your citations. 

Who is it for? All University staff and PGR students

What will you gain? You will create your own desktop account with Endnote and learn how to create, download, organise and your references. We will also use “cite while you write” to create citations and a bibliography in Word.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Learning Space, Seaborne Library Book Here
14:00 – 15:00

Parliament, Policy and Your Research

Fran Humphry, Research & Knowledge Transfer Office

This session will provide an overview of the workings of the UK Parliament and how Parliament uses research to inform policy. It will explain the various ways in which researchers can engage with Parliament, including information about giving evidence to Select Committees and how to engage with the House of Commons and Lords libraries and the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), Parliament's in-house source of independent analysis of public-policy issues related to science and technology and the Social Sciences. It will also include discussion of how to communicate research in a policy context.

Who is this for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? You will leave with an understanding of the importance of research to the policy arena and able to identify opportunities to feed your research into Parliament’s work.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities)  16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

MOLLOY CML114 Book Here
16:00 – 17:00

How to Publish your Research Webinar

Taylor Dietrich - Cambridge University Press

Taylor will be joining us via web link to share practical advice and expert tips on publishing both articles and monographs with Cambridge University Press.

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR students

What will you gain? Expert knowledge on the publication process

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

SENATE HOUSE CSH103 Book Here

18:00 – 19:30

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Public Lecture: Title TBC

Key Note Speaker: Dr Christian Dunn, Senior Lecturer in Zoology @ Bangor University

Overview

TBC

About Dr Christian Dunn

Dr Dunn is an award-winning environmental campaigner and public speaker. He has given two TEDx talks and regularly appears on local and national TV, radio and press publications talking about environmental and climate issues.

Dr Dunn has started a campaign for a #StrawFreeChester which seeks to make Chester the first city in the UK to stop single-use plastic drinking straws. Dr Dunn’s campaign is going from strength to strength with the Guardian newspaper describing Chester as one of the UK’s most ‘anti-plastic’ cities.

Dr Dunn conducts research across a wide range of wetland science topics with a particular interest in wetland biogeochemical cycles, especially in-terms of how these can affect the environment. Another area of his research is plastic and microplastic pollution, with a particular emphasis on microplastics in inland water systems and the use of wetlands to remove them.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 13 (Climate Action), 14 (Life Below Water), 15 (Life on Land)

Refreshments will be served from 6pm (in an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup)

BINKS CBK011 Booking not yet available
Tuesday 28th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

09:00 – 10:30

An Overview of the University’s Research and Knowledge Transfer Strategy

Prof Nick Avis, Pro Vice Chancellor Research & Knowledge Transfer

An update and overview will be presented on the draft new Research and Knowledge Transfer strategy. This will reflect the views of the new Vice-Chancellor and our strategy for the next REF exercise (deadline c. 2028).

Audience members are welcome to make suggestions to improve the research and knowledge transfer activities of the University and how these activities enhance the student experience.

Who’s it for? University PGR Staff and Students

What will you gain? Insight into the current thinking of the future Research and Knowledge Transfer strategy and how these mesh with the TEF, REF and KEF.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B2, B3 & C2

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions), 17 (Partnership for the Goals)

WESTMINSTER CWE219/2 Book Here
10:30 – 11:30

Research that Makes a Difference: Project Design for Impact

Prof David Clough, Professor of Theological Ethics

Research projects that can demonstrate impact beyond the academy are attractive to many funders, contribute to good performance in the REF, and may even help make the world a better place. How can researchers build good prospects for impact into the design of research projects? David Clough is Principal Investigator of a three-year AHRC-funded project on the Christian Ethics of Farmed Animal Welfare. In this session he will reflect on how he designed the project with impact in mind and what he has learned two years on, and will discuss with attendees how impact could be built into their research projects.

Who’s if for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? Insight into the role of impact in research project design

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1

Sustainable Development Goal: 2 (No Hunger), 13 (Climate Action), 15 (Life on Land)

WESTMINSTER CWE125/1 Book Here
11:30 – 13:00

“The How…” Research Methodologies

Richard Wiseman, Visiting Lecturer in Drama

This session will be a seminar at which a number of Postgraduate students from the Performing Arts Department (PhD and MRes candidates) will present their research. There will be a focus on the different methodological frameworks underpinning their work within the common discipline of Performing Arts, and how this is relatable to researchers outside of this discipline.

The session facilitators will also chair a group discussion about research methodologies, looking at how the Performing Arts as a discipline accommodates a breadth of research methods and approaches; challenging assumptions of arts based practices and recognising developments in this research sector.

Who’s it for? PGR Students and prospective PGR students

What will you gain? An insight into a range of different research methodologies

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1

Sustainable Development Goal: 2 (No Hunger), 8 (Good Jobs and Economic Growth) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production

Kingsway room TBC Book Here
13:00 – 13:20

Tour of NoWFOOD

An opportunity for staff and students to view the state-of-the-art laboratories and services available for use at NoWFOOD

Researcher Development Framework Domain:B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 2 (No Hunger), 8 (Good Jobs and Economic Growth) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production)

NoWFOOD (please report to reception) Book Here

13:30 -13:50

Tour of NoWFOOD

An opportunity for staff and students to view the state-of-the-art laboratories and services available for use at NoWFOOD.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 2 (No Hunger), 8 (Good Jobs and Economic Growth) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production)

NoWFOOD (please report to reception) Book Here
14:00 – 15:30

The Concepts of Quantitative Research (for beginners)

Lee Hulbert-Williams, Applied Psychology MSc Programme Leader

In this lecture-style session I will cover the key arguments typically used in favour of quantitative research and help the audience become familiar with key ideas in the quantification of research topics. I will briefly discuss how direct observation and self-report can be made numerical, and how and why quantitative researchers place such importance on the reliability and validity of their data.

Who’s it for? University Staff and PGR Students. In particular, those new to quantitative research.

What will you gain? A familiarity with the arguments commonly used to support quantitative methods in research, and signposting to further reading and resources.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

MOLLOY CML112/3 Book Here

16:00 – 18:00

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTP), What and Why?

Mick Card, Regional Knowledge Transfer Advisor, Andy Lyon Associate Professor, - Marketing, Tourism and Events Management & Marie-Anne O'Neil, Research & Knowledge Transfer.

This session will explore Innovate UK’s KTP Programme and how it can be of benefit to academics and their students. It will also discuss Knowledge Transfer Networks and how they facilitate research relationships with business and industry.

Who is it for? University Staff interested in engaging with business via academic projects

What will you gain?  Practical advice on how to get involved and how to apply for one, and an understanding of the benefits and disadvantages of this scheme.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3 & C3

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

Queens Park CCU101 Book Here
Wednesday 29th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

09:00 – 13:00

 

Tea, Coffee

& Biscuits,

& Lunch 

Provided

Fast Track Your Impact

Prof Mark Reed, Fast Track Impact – Fast Track Impact is an international training company working in the Higher Education and research and innovation sectors.

Fast track the impact of your research

  • Thinking tools: What is impact?
  • Practical tools for busy researchers
    • Prioritising which stakeholders and publics to engage with first
    • Planning for impact efficiently and effectively

Writing the impact sections of a fellowship application or other grant proposal

  • Small group discussion of example impact summaries and pathways to impact
  • Presentation: secrets of success

Who’s if for? University Staff and PGR Students

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BRIDGE CBH110 Book Here

14:00 – 16:30

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits

Provided

Facilitating Impact

Prof Mark Reed, Fast Track Impact – Fast Track Impact is an international training company working in the Higher Education and research and innovation sectors.

Facilitating conversations, meetings and workshops for impact

  • Effective conversations and meetings with academics and stakeholders for impact:
    • Structuring meetings to prevent people dominating or being marginalized
    • Techniques for increasing your power and confidence when you have to facilitate challenging individuals and groups

Managing impact

  • Managing impact culture:
    • Motivating researchers to engage with impact
    • Diagnosing and changing your impact culture
  • Managing impact generation
    • Making impact generating attractive
    • Build your impact potential
  • Managing impact case studies for REF2021
    • Common missing impacts, giving feedback and prioritising impacts for support

Who’s if for? University Staff and PGR Studentsthis session is particularly aimed at Professional Services Staff who support academic staff.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 5 (Gender Equality), 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure) 10 (Reduced Inequalities)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BRIDGE CBH110 Book Here

18:30 – 19:30

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits

Provided

Public Lecture: Drawing in Drag by Marie Duval

Dr Simon Grennan, Leading Research Fellow

Dr Simon Grennan, Leading Research Fellow in the Faculty of Humanities, scholar of Victorian comics and acclaimed comic strip artist himself, will take you through an engaging, illustrated public lecture.

Trouser-wearing, French-speaking, home-wrecking Victorian cartoonist and actress Marie Duval – best known for her work on Allie Sloper – appears to have drawn a new comic book. But, looking more closely, Drawing in Drag by Marie Duval is the latest offering from celebrated cartoonist and University of Chester staff member Dr Simon Grennan, performing as Duval, as though Duval had been revived in the twenty-first century. Accompany Simon on his helter-skelter ride through the wild country of Victorian cartooning, identity-swapping and ostrich riding in this lively, accessible and fun lecture.

Who’s it for? Everyone, this is a public lecture

What will you gain? Insight into the ways in which graphic adaptation can reveal exciting aspects of shared history, in particular, the leisure industries of Victorian London. Insight into the range of types of innovative research activities at the University.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 5 (Gender Equality)

Refreshments will be served from 6pm (in an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup)

BINKS CBK107 Book Here
Thursday 30th April

09:00 – 10:00

Knowledge Exchange Framework (KEF) Workshop

Prof Nick Avis, Pro Vice Chancellor Research & Knowledge Transfer

The Knowledge Exchange Framework (KEF) is the newest of the frameworks by which the performance of UK universities is judged. The KEF sits alongside the REF and TEF and is concerned with providing universities with new tools to;

  • understand, benchmark and improve their performance on how well universities foster knowledge sharing and research commercialisation and capture the rich network of collaborations between universities and businesses;
  • provide business and other users with more information on universities;
  • provide greater public visibility and accountability.

This workshop will detail the metrics by which we will be judged and how we are performing against our cluster members. The audience will be invited to make suggestions as to how we can improve our performance in the future.

Who’s if for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of the current state-of-play associated with KEF and how the University is performing against its cluster’s average. Actions to improve our performance will also be highlighted.

Researcher Development Framework Domain:

Sustainable Development Goal: 8 (Good jobs and economic growth), 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions), 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

WESTMINSTER CWE219/1

Book Here

10:00 – 11:00

Doing more with less: challenges and opportunities for research in teaching-facing institutions

Prof Craig Twist, Leader of the Applied Sports Sciences Research Group

Engaging in research-related activities provides multiple benefits to the individual and the institution. However, in institutions where teaching activities take precedence, staff are often faced with several challenges that compromise their scholarly endeavours. Understanding these challenges and developing strategies to meet them is therefore important for staff seeking to include research as part of their role. Using applied examples from the speaker’s own research journey, this talk will explore the challenges and propose strategies for establishing a research plan, manufacturing research time, funding and resourcing research in teaching-orientated institutions.

Who’s it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An opportunity to discuss and share their own challenges for conducting research and how these might be met.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A, B & C

Sustainable Development Goal:5 (Quality Education) 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions)

CLOISTERS CCL101

Book Here

11:00 – 13:00

Advanced Endnote 

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

This will be an advanced session using Endnote for those already with a working knowledge of how to use this reference management software. We will look at editing and creating citation styles, deduplication, using filters and creating your own SmartGroups. Feel free to come along with your queries!

Who is it for? All University staff and PGR students.

What will you gain? Knowledge on how to use the more advanced features of Endnote to organise your research.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1 &C2

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library

Book Here

13:00 – 13:20

Tour of NoWFOOD

An opportunity for staff and students to view the state-of-the-art laboratories and services available for use at NoWFOOD.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: : 2 (No Hunger), 8 (Good Jobs and Economic Growth) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure) 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production)

NoWFOOD (please report to reception)

Book Here

13:30 – 13:50

Tour of NoWFOOD

An opportunity for staff and students to view the state-of-the-art laboratories and services available for use at NoWFOOD.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: : 2 (No Hunger), 8 (Good Jobs and Economic Growth) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure) 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production)

NoWFOOD (please report to reception)

Book Here

14:00-15:30

The first hurdle: “So, what’s your research about?”

Jamie-Glyn Bale, Deborah Thomas & Richard Wiseman (PhD Students)

Developing and articulating either a specific research question or an entire research project is a challenge that PGR students encounter consistently on their research journey. 

This practical workshop for aspiring and current PGR students of all and any fields, led by the Kingsway Creative Campus PGR office, will focus on the conceptualisation and communication of research ideas. Utilizing experiential arts-based methods the session will explore how we can be pragmatic and concise in the way we share our research knowledge in a non-reductionist manner that doesn’t “take all exploration, creativity and fluidity out of the research process: (O’Leary, 2017).

Who’s it for? Aspiring and current PGR students of all and any fields

What will you gain? Arts-based approaches to conceptualisation and communication of research ideas that are applicable to researchers in any field of study.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C2

Sustainable Development Goal: 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities)

(Kingsway room tbc)

Book Here

16:00 – 17:00

ChesterRep, Open Access and Your Research

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

Unsure of what ChesterRep is about? This session will provide you with an overview of ChesterRep the University of Chester's institutional repository. We will outline the process for depositing your work and look at key drivers regarding storing and curating the University’s research outputs, REF2021, Open Access and embargos. We will also practice making submissions.

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? You will gain knowledge into the key reasons to use ChesterRep, how to request an account (if you do not have one), and how to submit your work

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B2, C1 & D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library

Book Here

18:30

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

‘Happy’ Animals make good scientific subjects and conservation successes: the ethical, scientific and conservation merits of good animal welfare

Tessa Smith is a Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Chester.

Ensuring good welfare for both wild and captive animals is essential not only from an ethical standpoint but also to ensure valid scientific research and sustainable conservation outcomes. Captive animals with good welfare produce more reliable, biologically valid, robust, repeatable scientific data compared to their counterparts with poorer welfare.  ‘Happy’ animals live longer, can be used repeatedly and need replacing less often hence moving towards satisfaction of the 3Rs (refine, reduce and replace: the guiding principles for the use of animals in research).  In the wild, ‘happy’ animals have enhanced reproductive success, stronger immune function, sharper cognitive abilities and fine-tuned adaptive capabilities which favour survival amidst the challenges of the Anthropocene.

Tessa’s research develops novel non-invasive methods to quantify physiological levels of stress hormones excreted by animals across the taxon from fish to primates. Tessa uses these physiological tools in parallel with behavioural measures to assess and optimise animal welfare with the goal of improving animal subjective well-being (i.e. ‘happiness’).  The talk will critically explore Tessa’s development and application of these tools to assess animal welfare questions in wild populations (e.g. is there a link between stress and the spread of Tuberculosis in badgers? ) together with captive animals housed in zoos (e.g. does the presence of zoo visitors impact zoo animals?), farms (e.g. do commercial fish farming practises cause stress?), laboratories (e.g. does the presence of a social companion reduce the negative impact of routine husbandry practices?), domestic settings (e.g. is behaviour a reliable indicator of stress in horses?) and semi-free ranging environments (e.g. is social stress a problem for semi-managed endangered primates?).  Tessa’s research collaborations span the globe and have resulted in over 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals.

Who’s if for? Everyone, this is a public lecture

Free tea and coffee will be served in the foyer from 6pm.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 15 (Life on Land)

Beswick Lecture Theatre 017, Parkgate Road,

For booking

please email events@chester.ac.uk

Friday 1st May

9:30 – 10:00

Conceptions of ‘Research’ and their Gendered Impact on Research Activity: A UK Case Study

Dr Ruth Healy, Associate Professor in Pedagogy in Higher Education

The last twenty years have seen an increased emphasis around the world on the quality and quantity of research in response to national research assessments, international league tables, and changes in government funding. The prevailing attitude in higher education embeds research as the ‘gold standard’ in the context of academic activity. However, a key feature of this trend is significant gender differences in research activity. This research brings together two separate bodies of work (1) the impact of gender on academic research careers, and (2) academic conceptions of research.

Who’s it for? University Staff and Postgraduate Students seeking academic careers

What will you gain? An exploration of gender differences in research activity and how this relates to conceptions of what counts as ‘research’. 

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education) 5 (Gender Equality)

MOLLOY CML009

Book Here

10:00 – 10:45

Renewable Energy Development in Developing Countries

M Shakir Tahiri Jaan, MRes Student Applied Sciences

Developing countries such as Bangladesh have the highest number of Solar Home Systems which is equivalent to 5.2 million small scale systems part funded by World Bank alongside the government, through the state company IDCOL. Bangladesh is replacing diesel power generated irrigation water pumps with solar irrigation PV systems which is reducing the cost of irrigation by half due to the 50% grant provided by World Bank for Solar Irrigation Systems. Through this program, off-grid areas of Bangladesh are thriving in terms of Farm Management and the local businesses which primarily relied on Diesel powered systems are buying electricity in prepaid method from solar power companies which is benefiting their business as cost of solar is less than diesel. Solar mini grids are becoming popular for such remote areas where there was no electricity before. Currently, Bangladesh government is financing for Solar Grid tied projects to achieve the targets of 10% of total electricity produced from renewables. There is a substantial amount of research opportunities in this field to further develop solar PV systems and the fact that the government does not allow Solar Power Plants to be built on Agriculture Land due to land scarcity. I would like to mention the research opportunity in terms of Agro-Voltaics which proves that Solar Power Plant could be built on Agricultural land and we could benefit both farming and energy harvest at the same time.   

Who’s it for? University Staff, Renewable Energy Industry and Students

What will you gain? Knowledge about the current developments and research opportunities in developing countries

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 1 (No Poverty), 3 (Good Health and Wellbeing), 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), 13 (Climate Action)

BINKS CBK106/2

Book Here

11:00 – 12:30

Making inferences from Numerical Data (for beginners)

Lee Hulbert-Williams, Applied Psychology MSc Programme Leader

This workshop-style session will introduce attendees to the concept of a statistical model, to the concepts of signal and noise, and will signpost attendees towards more in-depth resources from which to learn about a variety of statistical tests. It will also introduce attendees to a free and open-source piece computer application (Jamovi) which can be used to test such models.

Who’s it for? University Staff and Students, in particular, those new to quantitative research

This session may also be of interest to professional staff who have to draw conclusions from numerical data

What will you gain? A familiarity with the key concepts in quantitative research methods, a basic familiarity with Jamovi statistical software, and signposting to further reading and resources.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A2

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education)

CHRITCHLEY CCR133 (PC Lab)

 

Book Here

14:00 – 15:30

An Introduction to Research Professional

Nick Epiphaniou, Research Professional

Research Professional provides a comprehensive database of news and funding opportunities in the academic research market, across multiple research disciplines. This session will take you through the functionality of Research Professional and how you can set up personal email alerts for your research area. The session will be a mixture of presentation and hands-on practice, giving you the opportunity to explore the full functionality of Research Professional, set up some alerts and ask any questions that you may have.

Who is this for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will yu gain? Learn how to search across thousands of UK and international funding opportunities funding and set up a Research Professional search profile in order to receive personalised funding opportunity alerts.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C3

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

CHRITCHLEY CCR115 (PC Lab)

Book Here

Monday 4th May
10:00 – 12:00

Introduction to Research-Informed Teaching

Dr Michaela Borg & Dr Allison O’Sullivan, Senior Academic Development Advisers, Learning and Teaching Institute

This workshop is intended for colleagues who would like to:

  1. develop their understanding of the different ways that research and teaching interconnect in the curriculum;
  2. enrich their students’ learning by developing these ideas further.

Using Jenkins and Healey’s influential model, we will analyse current practices, share experiences and activities and start planning how we can further develop research—teaching links in the curriculum.

Who’s it for? University Staff  

What will you gain? A greater understanding of the different ways that research and teaching interconnect in the curriculum using a well-known model and practical ideas for how to develop this further

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education)

WESTMINSTER CWE124/1 Book Here
12:00 – 13:00

ChesterRep, Open Access and Your Research

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

Unsure of what ChesterRep is about? This session will provide you with an overview of ChesterRep the University of Chester's institutional repository. We will outline the process for depositing your work and look at key drivers regarding storing and curating the University’s research outputs, REF2021, Open Access and embargos. We will also practice making submissions.

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? You will gain knowledge into the key reasons to use ChesterRep, how to request an account (if you do not have one), and how to submit your work

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B2, C1 & D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library Book Here

14:00 – 17:00

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Research Ethics Training

David Carpenter, Trainer in Research Ethics (HRA, ARMA, UKRIO)

The UK Research Integrity Office will be delivering a training session which will include;

1. The basics of REC constitutions and terms of reference: What are RECs for? What is their scope? What do they do? How should they do it (including the systematic application of moral theory)?

2. Structures, roles and relationships: the distinctive natures of research ethics, governance and integrity.

3. Exploring common ground and disciplinary differences across university departmental and faculty RECs, from biomedical research to social research to ethical challenges in the performing and creative arts.

4. Application to external bodies, e.g. Health Research Authority ethics review and governance approval.

5. Ethical research - from conception to dissemination: ethical design (relationships between methodologies/ methods and ethics), ethical conduct (recruitment of participants, seeking consent, processing data, preserving confidentiality) and ethical dissemination (publication ethics).

6. Challenges, such as: vulnerable participants; participants lacking mental capacity to consent; use of human tissue; clinical trials of drugs and devices.

Who’s it for? University Staff, particularly Research Ethics Committee Members

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C1

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BINKS CBK013/1&/2 Book Here
Tuesday 5th May

10:00 – 11:00

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

ReproducibiliTea Party

Dr Suzanne Stewart, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Bradley Kennedy & Sabrina Norwood PhD students in Psychology
ReproducibiliTea is a monthly journal club organised through the Chester Open Research Alliance (CORA). After starting at Oxford, ReproducibiliTea clubs now exist at 77 institutions across the world (https://reproducibilitea.netlify.com/), and the initiative is supported by the UK Reproducibility Network (https://www.bristol.ac.uk/psychology/research/ukrn/). ReproducibiliTea is a relaxed, informal opportunity to learn about and discuss issues related to reproducibility, replication, questionable research practices, and open research.

The festival’s ReproducibiliTea Party will involve flash presentations on resources related to reproducibility followed by open-ended, informal small-group discussions.

Who’s it for? University Staff and Students, Early career researchers (including PGR students) are particularly encouraged to join in

What will you gain? Attendees will gain some new knowledge and perspectives on reproducibility and openness in research generated through group discussion. In addition, they will become more aware of the global ReproducibiliTea initiative and of the university’s own open research working group, CORA. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet fellow researchers who are interested in reproducibility and open research.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C1

Sustainable Development Goal: 17 (Partnerships for the Goal)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

MOLLOY CML104

Book Here

11:00 – 12:00

Research Integrity - An Introduction to Epigeum Training

Marie-Anne O-Neil, Deputy Head of Department RKTO

As part of the University’s ongoing drive to continue to support high-quality institutional research and to meet the requirements of the current ‘Concordat to Support Research Integrity’, we have recently subscribed to the Research Integrity training programme provided by Epigeum.  As the leading external provider of online courses for HE institutions, we are pleased to be able to offer this training resource to colleagues across the University.

This session is an introduction to the training programme and how to access it.

Who is it for? University Staff & PGR Students - in particular PGR Supervisors, Early Career Researcher and staff who apply for external research grants and contracts. 

What will you gain? An understanding of what Epigeum training is and how to access it. 

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A1, B3 & C1

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education) 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

MOLLOY CML009

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13:00 – 14:00

Bibliometrics

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

This session will explore bibliometrics (citation and alt) and look at how they can be used help to create and enhance your research.

Who is this for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of bibliometrics and how they can help in the context of research impact and reach.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: A2, C1, D2 & D3

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library

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14:30 – 16:00

 

Reception 16:00 – 17:00

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

How can open practices help you get published?

Alex Wood & Michael Willis, Wiley Publishing & Suzanne Stewart, Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Open research practices are becoming more prevalent and necessary across a number of evidence-based disciplines, but many researchers feel uncertain about what they need to do and how. The publishing house Wiley is delivering a number of workshops about open research at British universities, including this one. Wiley are a stakeholder in the UK Reproducibility Network and are champions of open research practices.

This is an interactive workshop for researchers about how you can be successful and build your profile when you adopt open research and publishing practices, focusing on getting feedback and research authorship.

The 90-minute workshop will include presentation and active discussion designed to inspire informed and robust choices when you conduct, publish, and share your research work, and to give you the material you need for discussions. You’ll leave the workshop with insights into good authorship practices, new ways to get feedback when it matters. You can use this information in research collaborations with your peers.

Who’s it for? University staff and PGR students. Early career researchers and PGR students are particularly encouraged to attend.

What will you gain? Attendees will gain knowledge and practical advice from an established, external organisation which is a key player in the research publishing system. Attendees will be able to begin using open practices in their own research following the session and will leave with some helpful resources about how to do this.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C1

Sustainable Development Goal: Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BINKS CBK013/1&/2

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Wednesday 6th May

09:00 – 12:00

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, & Lunch  Provided

The Digital Academic

Prof Mark Reed, Fast Track Impact – Fast Track Impact is an international training company working in the Higher Education and research and innovation sectors.

From passive digital footprint to active engagement without risking time or reputation

  • How happy are you with your digital footprint?
  • How to become “impact ready” and bring coherence to a fractured digital footprint without wasting time online

Achieving impact using social media

  • The promise of social media in theory
  • The realities of social media in practice
  • Reducing risks online
  • Developing a social media strategy for your research
  • Case study

Who’s if for? University Staff and PGR Students

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D

Sustainable Development Goal: Goal: 4 (Quality Education), 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BEST CBB013

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13:00 – 17:00

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Research Excellence Framework Impact Masterclass

Prof Mark Reed, Fast Track Impact – Fast Track Impact is an international training company working in the Higher Education and research and innovation sectors.

Impact for REF2021

  • Impact: what works?
  • Tools to generate impact efficiently:
    • Prioritising which stakeholders and publics to engage with first
    • Planning for impact efficiently and effectively

What makes a 4* impact case study in REF?

  • Latest intelligence on role of impact in REF2021
  • What makes a 4* case study?

Tracking, evaluating and evidencing impact

  • Impact tracking – local systems and sharing good practice
  • How to design an impact evaluation
  • “How would you prove that?” discussion of impact claims that are difficult to evidence

Who’s if for?  All University Staff and PGR Students are welcome however (Priority will be given to REF Unit Co-ordinators)

Researcher Development Framework Domain: D

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education) 17 (Partnership for the Goals)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BEST CBB013

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18:30 – 19:30

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided from 6pm

Public Lecture: "The Importance of Urban Biodiversity"
Key Note Speaker: Steve Hughes, Industrial Chemist & Eco Warrior

Overview

The difference between the natural world and urban environments is often stark, this cannot be the accepted norm in a sustainable world. Understanding why this is so important and how we go about it could just be the key to a more balanced relationship with nature.

About Steve Hughes

Steve Hughes is a local Eco campaigner who has spearheaded an impressive campaign to bring Supertrees to Chester. A plan to renovate the unloved and largely abandoned Hoole way roundabout with 5-metre-high metallic trees which plants will grow around and through. Steve, who works as a polymer chemist was inspired by Sir David Attenborough and the BBC's Planet Earth II 'Cities' episode, to increase biodiversity in Chester, through the use of Supertrees.

“One of the problems when I start to talk about environmental issues in Chester is its always very detached. People think it’s about the great barrier reef or the arctic tundra, it’s all a million miles away from where they are. I wanted to make something local. The trees themselves provide an environment in a city which wouldn’t normally exist to allow a certain type of plant life to grow, increasing the biodiversity.”

Refreshments will be available from 6pm.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B3

Sustainable Development Goal: 3(Good Health and Wellbeing), 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), 13 (Climate Action), 15 (Life on Land)

Refreshments will be served from 6pm (in an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BINKS CBK011

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Thursday 7th May

09:00 – 13:00

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, & Lunch Provided

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Open Research and Data Managements Plans

Shanmugasundaram Venkataraman, Training Lead and Research Data Specialist, Digital Curation Centre

This 0.5-day workshop will introduce the concepts of open research and data management plans (DMPs) and will teach researchers and students successful methods for engaging in, and be shown the benefits of, data sharing and will enable them to dispel common fears. Practical sessions will offer the opportunity to examine different approaches and discuss what might be adapted for the University of Chester context.

Who’s it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of Successful methods for engaging in and of the benefits of open research and data management.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: C1

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure) 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

This session will have catering. In an effort to reduce the University's use of single use materials we encourage you to bring your own reusable cup.

BINKS CBK106/1

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14:00 – 15:00

Researcher Profiles and Orcid – How to distinguish yourself from everyone else

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

An overview of the various ways available for researchers to create their own unique profiles in order to maximise the visibility and credit of their research, and avoid misidentification.

Who is this for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An awareness of the purpose and benefits of having a researcher profile and where we can create them.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B2, B3, C1 & D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 4 (Quality Education) 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 17 (Partnerships for the Goals)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library

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15:30 – 16:30

Demystifying Open Access Publishing and ChesterRep 

Helen Thomas/Gavin Moore, LIS Research Support

Confused about the terminology around Open Access? We will look at the importance of Open Access publishing, policies and eligibility for REF2021 and how this impacts on the works in ChesterRep.

Who is this for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of Open Access policy and terminology. How this impacts on what we can do with our research outputs in ChesterRep so they can gain increased discoverability and access.

Researcher Development Framework Domain: B2, C1 & D2

Sustainable Development Goal: 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure)

Learning Space, Seaborne Library

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Beyond the Festival

25 June 2020

Academic Research Advice Exchange Day, Binks Building, Parkgate Road

Dr Mark Duffy, Reader in Media and Cultural Studies

Academic research is a process, the success of which can be improved by the learning of particular attitudes, practices and techniques. In 2012, we put on an institution-wide Academic Research Advice Exchange Day. Researchers at all levels from different faculties and departments across the institution passed on their understandings about research as a process to early career colleagues and PGR students. Another such event has been arranged in the same building for late June this year. The day will be divided up into 30 minute slots, which could be used for individual talks or put together for longer workshop or panel sessions. To give you an idea of the scope of this event, some of the topics covered last time included: literature searching; article writing; securing book contracts; practical advice by staff doing PhDs; PhD by publication; and REF strategy. There are many more topics than this that could be covered, including: organizing academic events; proposing and completing edited volumes; grant bidding; mentoring less experienced staff, etc. It would be great if you could contribute your skills and experiences, especially if you are a more experienced member of academic staff. You do not need to be ten steps ahead before you can help others. Finally, it would be interesting to hear colleagues talk about things that have failed or obstacles they have encountered, and what things they have learned from that particular experience enabling them to move forward. Please keep this date in your diary, circulate this news to other staff and PGR students, volunteer your expertise, and click on the link below to register:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/academic-research-advice-exchange-day-tickets-97296381095

​Deadline for proposals for speaker participation: 1 June 2020.

Contact

If you have any queries please contact the Research and Knowledge Transfer office

Email: researchfestival@chester.ac.uk  

Tel: 01244 511063