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The majority of events are for staff and students. For further details on public lectures, please see our Events page.

Monday 8th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:30-10:30

Meet with the Research and Knowledge Transfer Office: Drop In Session

Come and meet some members of the team over some tea and coffee and find out what we do and how we can support you with externally funded activities / research. We can answer any queries you may have about the RO1 process, all levels of staff are welcome from Faculty Admin to Faculty Deans!

Who is it for? University Staff

What will you gain? A better understanding of how the team can support you. A better understanding of the RO1 process and what it all means.

Old College

Common Room

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11:00-12:00

Workshop: Endnote, An Introduction 
LIS Research Support Team

An introductory training session for people new to using this reference management software

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? A basic knowledge of how to use Endnote to organise your research.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

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12:00-13:30

 Becoming an Open Scientist: Lessons from the Replication Crisis 
Dr Suzanne Stewart & Brad Kennedy, Psychology
     

The replication crisis in Psychology and other disciplines was the result of widely accepted but questionable research practices, a lack of transparency in the scientific reporting process, and the incentives that encouraged these. In response to this crisis, scientists across many fields are changing the conduct of research through adopting the principles and practices of Open Science. Its principles can be summarised as open source, open data, open access, and open workflow; and the practices that fulfil these principles are now being encouraged through the REF, journal and funder requirements, teaching and learning strategies, academic post advertisements, and dedicated scholarly societies and networks *please note that attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop to follow along with a practical demonstration, but this is not strictly necessary and attendees are welcome to observe this portion of the session if they wish.

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? The aims of this session are to (1) inform participants about the Open Science movement and its principles and practices, (2) draw on examples from social and biomedical areas (e.g., Psychology) to illustrate the necessity of open practices to rigorous scientific research, and (3) discuss and demonstrate some open practices that participants can adopt in their own research.

Best 116

(Parkgate Road)

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14:00-15:00

Transitioning into Research from Professional Backgrounds
Dr Julie Mulliner, Assistant HR Director

A reflective account of my PhD journey through the lens of a Human Resource Professional.  This session provides an overview of the various experiences, emotions, challenges and how I’ve personally developed and changed along the way.

Who is it for? For any member of Professional Services staff who may be considering embarking on their PhD journey, or for anybody who is part-way through their PhD journey

What will you gain? An insight into the ups and downs in respect of the process and emotions

Ideas on how to keep focused and motivated when everyone else is getting on with life.

Hollybank 008

(Parkgate Road)

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16:00-17:00

How to Publish your Research Webinar 
Emily Marchant, Cambridge University Press

Emily will be joining us via web link to share practical advice and expert tips on publishing with Cambridge University Press

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR students

What will you gain? Expert knowledge on the publication process.

Senate House 103

(Parkgate Road)

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18:00-19:30

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

18:00-18:30

Key Note Lecture: Bog bodies: face-to-face with the past 
Dr Melanie Giles, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, University of Manchester

Why have the well-preserved remains of Iron Age people found in bogs across north-western Europe, captivated the attention not just of archaeologists but poets, film-makers, philosophers and curators? In this lecture, I will explore remains from northern Britain, Ireland and Denmark, firstly from a mortuary perspective: examining what the forensic evidence can tell us about their lives and deaths.

New research on Lancashire's bog heads 'Worsley Man' and 'Ashton Man' will be presented alongside a richer understanding of the landscapes and legends of bogs and boggarts. The talk will also review some of the ethical issues surrounding their display and interpretation in museums. By critically considering the slight-of-hand performed by conservation strategies, I will explore how this final stage of their biography contributes to what Seamus Heaney memorably described as their ‘riddling power’.

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture

Beswick 017

(Parkgate Road)

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Tuesday 9th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:00-10:00

An Introduction to Research at Thornton 
Prof. Garfield Southall, Exec. Dean Science & Engineering

Prof Garfield Southall, Executive Dean of Science and Engineering, will provide an overview of the range and depth of research currently conducted at Thornton Science Park.  A range of research-active staff will showcase their current work and areas of expertise.  This will be only a small sample of our activity at Thornton, with a selection from:

  • Dr Jason Roberts – Mathematics, Ecology and Finance
  • Dr Gavin Hazell – Bio-inspired Surface Nanostructures
  • Dr David Ward – Fuel Cells for Future Energy and Transport
  • Dr Bin Yang – Exploring the THz region of the Electromagnetic Spectrum
  • Dr Yousaf Khalid – Intelligent Multi-Vector Hybrid Energy Systems
  • Dr Yuli Yang – LiFi: Moving Beyond WiFi

The session will end with an overview of research facilities at Thornton Science Park, and an invitation to visit on our Open Afternoon on Monday 15th April.

Who is it for? All University staff and students interested in research and the potential for collaborations.

What will you gain? An overview of the range of research activities at Thornton and an insight into the potential for collaboration with the Faculty of Science and Engineering and the wider Thornton eco-system.

Best 116

(Parkgate Road)

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10:00-11:00

Workshop: Internal KT Funding Grants at the University of Chester

Marie-Anne O’Neil, Acting Head of the RKTO will be offering expert advice and guidance on what internal KT funding grants are for and how you can apply for them.

This is an opportunity for staff to bring potential KT project ideas for discussion.

Who is it for? University Staff

What will you gain? An understanding of the eligibility criteria, requirements and application process of internal KT funding scheme.

Best 013

(Parkgate Road)

Book via Eventbrite
11:00-12:00

KEF Surgery
Nick Avis, Pro Vice Chancellor Research and Knowledge Transfer

With Research England developing the new Knowledge Exchange Framework this is an opportunity to discuss what we know so far and the implications for researchers

Who is it for? Academic and Research staff

What will you gain? A brief background on the KEF for anyone new to it, and information about the preparations that are underway. This will be an opportunity to ask all your KEF related questions.

Best 013

(Parkgate Road)

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12:30-14:00

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Building a Departmental Research Culture, One Coffee (or Tea) at a Time
Dr Helen Southall & Dr Thaddeus Eze, Computer Science

Departments are coming under increasing pressure to improve their performance according to many measures, from NSS and TEF to REF and beyond.  In these circumstances, maintaining an existing level of research activity within a department can be difficult; growing and developing a research culture almost from scratch is a real challenge.  We describe some activities which have been helpful in our department.  This will also be an opportunity to share and discuss approaches which have helped in other disciplines or locations

Who is it for? University Staff

What will you gain? Insight on how to leverage existing expertise to stimulate research interest and build inter/intra departmental collaboration.

Chritchley 017

(Parkgate Road)

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14:00-15:30

Using Statistics to Evidence your Research
Dr Shirley John & Clare Smith, Maths Skills Advisers

Effective use of statistics can provide evidence to support your research hypothesis and make your work more credible. However many researchers lack confidence in using statistical tools. This presentation will introduce the statistical investigation process and give some starting points for planning your quantitative analysis. It will outline the different stages that are needed from deciding how to collect some data through to methods of analysing it and presenting your results

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? An overview of the process of statistical investigation and the basics of statistical hypothesis testing, including details to consider when planning data collection and choosing a method of analysis.

Chritchley 014 (Parkgate Road) Book via Eventbrite

16:00-17:00

Using Naturally Occurring Data in Research
Dr Nikki Kiyimba, Social and Political Science

This presentation will discuss the benefits and limitations of using naturally occurring data, and offer some suggestions for its use in different research fields. As a qualitative researcher working primarily in an applied practice-based context, Dr Kiyimba most often uses naturally occurring data. This is in contrast to the use of what has been referred to as 'researcher generated' data such as that collected through interviews or focus groups. Her preference for data that has not been created solely for research purposes, including existing textual documents, and existing recordings of interactions, is that the context of the opinions and views shared remains intact

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? An understanding of what sorts of naturally occurring data exist, methodologies surrounding the subject, and how you could incorporate this into your own research area.

Hollybank 008

(Parkgate Road)

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18:00-19:30

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

18:00-18:30

Key Note Lecture: Bugs, Bites and Parasites
Prof. Janet Hemingway, Professor in Vector Biology, Liverpool School for Tropical Medicine

How do you get the World’s richest man to engage with your research and part with US$125M to support your proposed Agenda. The talk will describe the journey from concept to establishing a long term partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and others to deliver new tools, technologies and approaches to control malaria in Africa, and visceral leishmaniasis in India. This initiative, started in 2005 has already saved over 600K lives of infants and is contributing to the eradication of diseases that blight the lives of 100s of Millions of people. While much progress has been made there is still much to be done and key areas going forward will be highlighted.

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture

Beswick 017

(Parkgate Road)

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Wednesday 10th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:00-12:00

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

How Serious Games and Virtual Reality Can Strengthen Your Research

This multi-paper session by the department of Computer Science will explore how modern concepts, technologies and applications such as augmented, virtual or mixed reality, design sprints and methodologies, and games with serious applications can improve your existing and future research or open it to new collaborations.

Digital Heritage as an example of cross-faculty multi-disciplinary research 
Dr Helen Southall

Digital technologies such as virtual and augmented reality (VR & AR) and serious games have great potential for enhancing both academic research and public engagement with heritage sites and historical stories. Effective realisation of this potential requires collaboration across organisational and disciplinary boundaries, which can be challenging, but also offers many positive side-effects, beyond the research outputs themselves. I will describe work on digital heritage which has involved collaboration across four faculties (so far). This will also be an opportunity to discuss approaches which have helped in other disciplines and locations

XR Technologies Review, Present and Future
Lee Beever

This talk will outline and discuss the pros and cons of currently available and future XR (virtual reality, mixed reality, augmented reality) technologies in the context of cross discipline research

The Impact of Virtual Reality on Assisting Activities of Daily Living
Prof. Nigel John

This talk will provide an update on several research projects currently being carried out by the Medical Graphics Group within the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chester. We will describe how we are using VR to help with the cognitive rehabilitation of stroke patients, a driving simulator for powered wheelchair users, and more

Solving software problems with design sprints
Andrew Davies

Currently, there are many approaches to software design which facilitate user involvement and adequate software testing (including user-centred, lean, and agile approaches) but more recently, we’ve seen contemporary problem solving techniques emerge such as the 5-day design sprint, made popular by Jake Knapp and the Google Ventures team, which can be used to galvanise software teams and create more effective  software  products.  The  design  sprint  process  encourages  small  multidisciplinary  teams (including technical and non-technical staff) from across an organisation to work collaboratively on answering key questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers.

However, the original 5-day duration remains a barrier to adoption for organisations, and there is a need to compress and refine this process to offer a more manageable and less intimidating schedule, especially for less complex problems. To address this barrier, the Department of Computer Science and Business School, University of Chester, have been looking at ways to condense the process and apply a shortened version to software development projects.

Why So Serious ... Games? 
Dr Serban Pop

This entertaining presentation will explore the details and knowledge of the modern concepts of game- based learning and serious games focusing on the development pipeline from the early stage of drawing ideas until the final product. Example of serious games projects mixing computer science and sports or digital humanities will be presented

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? Serious computer games, combined with various flavours of virtual and augmented reality, are an becoming increasingly commonplace, and can be found in settings ranging from museums and sites of historic natural disasters, to building sites and teaching hospitals.  This session will look at the technology from various perspectives, ranging from a high-level view of the challenges of designing an effective applications, and what we can learn from already-established game design conventions, to applications of VR to the contrasting tasks of computer game level design and assistive devices for people with disabilities. We will also look at projects under way, and future possibilities, for cross-disciplinary research involving VR and AR technology.

Hollybank 002 (Parkgate Road) Book via Eventbrite

12:00-13:00

Lunch Provided

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTP), What and Why?
Mick Card, Regional Knowledge Transfer

Advisor

This session will explore Innovate UK’s KTP Programme.

Who is it for? University Staff interested in engaging with business via academic projects

What will you gain?  Practical advice on how to get involved and how to apply for one, and an understanding of the benefits and disadvantages of this scheme.

Price Tower 204

(Parkgate Road)

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13:00-14:00

Workshop: Bibliometrics and your Researcher Profile
LIS Research Support Team

This session will explore bibliometrics (citation and alt) and look at how they can be used help to create and enhance your research profile.

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of bibliometrics and how they can help in the context of research citation analysis and reach.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

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14:00-15:30

An Introduction to Research Professional
Nick Epiphaniou, Research Professional

Research Professional provides a comprehensive database of news and funding opportunities in the academic research market, across multiple research disciplines. This session will take you through the functionality of Research Professional and how you can set up personal email alerts for your research area. The session will be a mixture of presentation and hands-on practice, giving you the opportunity to explore the full functionality of Research Professional, set up some alerts and ask any questions that you may have.

Who is it for? University Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? Learn how to search across thousands of UK and international funding opportunities funding and set up a Research Professional search profile in order to receive personalised funding opportunity alerts.

Chritchley 133

(Parkgate Road)

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15:30-17:30

 

*This session is repeated on the 17th

Workshop: Using ChesterRep 
LIS Research Support Team

An overview of ChesterRep the University of Chester's institutional repository and an online platform which is designed to collate, store, and aid discoverability of research carried out at the university to the wider research community.

Who is it for? University Staff

What will you gain? In depth understanding of ChesterRep its purposes and processes. Understanding of how to submit your work, type, and post publication implications for your research output.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

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17:45-19:00

Refreshments served

17:45-18:00

Diabetes and Heart Failure
Dr Tom Butler, Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

This session is part of the Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition Research Seminar Series

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture

Beswick 017 (Parkgate Road)

Book by emailing:

a.morgan@chester.ac.uk 

Thursday 11th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:15-13:30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, & Lunch Provided

Improving Industry-Academy Relationships
Dr Gavin Philips, Department of Natural Sciences

An exploration of how relationships between Industry and the University can support education, generate research and support business growth. A series of short talks will be followed by a panel discussion, before culminating in lunch and the opportunity to network.

Confirmed Speakers include:
Jayne Hennessy, Peel Land and Property Group Management Limited
Universities working with commercial partners: A commercial perspective

Professor Chris Jones, Executive Dean of Chester Business School
Are university business schools still relevant to the enterprise community?

Nicole Fisher, Technical Assistant and BPR Dossier Team at Safe4 Disinfectant and Thornton Student
Rebecca Meadows, R&D Engineer at Motrac Race Engineering Ltd and Thornton Student

Learning while contributing to commercial endeavours

Steve Hammond, Managing Director, Motrac Race Engineering
Working with the University: The small business perspective.

Dr Andy Williams, Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering
Making Partnership with Industry Successful: Experience from working with the Automotive Industry

Q & A Panel Discussions: Improving Industry-Academy Relationships
Our panel will include:
Clare Dunkerley, Senior Process Engineer from Otto Simon Ltd, Dr Kirstie Simpson, Associate Dean, University of Chester Business School, Jayne Hennessey from Peel Land and Property Group Management Limited Richard Farrow, Head of Strategy Performance and Impact, University of Chester

Who is it for?
Academics wanting to become more commercial engaged.
Potential commercial partners wishing to learn more about working with the University of Chester
Academic managers who would like to engage more with commercial partners.
Research professionals wanting to understand the perspectives of academics and business.

Thornton Science

Park (room to be confirmed)

 

*All Staff & Students must complete the online induction before visiting Thornton.

Book via Eventbrite

 

 

*Bookings close on the 5th of April

13:00-14:00

Amphibian Welfare Assessments: Reflections and Overview
Dr Lottie Hosie and Prof. Tessa Smith, Biological Sciences

This session will begin with an overview of the recent 3yr NC3Rs funded research project on Amphibian welfare assessment, including our approach to getting funded.

Attendees will also be asked whether this research might have changed (or not!) their views on amphibians and their capabilities/status.

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? In addition to learning about amphibians, you will gain insight into each stage of a successful externally funded research project.

Chritchley 014

(Parkgate Road)

Book via Eventbrite

14:00-15:00

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Cake Provided

HR Excellence in Research Concordat
Elizabeth Christopher, Director of Research & Knowledge Transfer

The University has held the HR Excellence in Research Award since 2012 and has successfully renewed every 2 years since. The award recognises our work on the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers, so this session will cover the background to the Concordat and current developments. As we prepare the latest renewal application of the HREiR award this session will be an opportunity to hear about the most recent achievements and our proposed action plan.

Who is it for? Staff on research contracts and their line managers

What will you gain? Understanding of the Concordat. You’ll also be able to feed into the consultation – we need your feedback to make sure the planned actions really are supporting your career development as researchers…

Best 013

(Parkgate Road)

Book via Eventbrite
15:00-17:00

 Workshop: Endnote, Advanced
LIS Research Support Team

An advanced Endnote training session for those already with a working knowledge of how to use this reference management software. Your queries are also welcome.

Who is it for? All University Staff and PGR students.

What will you gain? An advanced knowledge of how to maximise Endnote to organise your research.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

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17:00-17:45

The Trabant and Memories of the Socialist State
Austen Lowe, Modern Languages

In 2009 Federal President Joachim Gauck commented that “Ostalgie verringert all das, was unsere Demokratie ausmacht” (Nostalgic feelings of the former GDR reduce everything that constitutes our democracy). Considered by some simply to be a harmless expression (Erklärung) of nostalgia for a disappeared way of life, by others as nothing short of the glorification (Verklärung) of a dictatorial regime,this paper explores debates on Ostalgie through the prism of the Trabant, the state's wooden, plastic, yet rather iconic car; the Trabant is a vehicle which makes a huge statement about political life in the Eastern bloc. Once considered the ultimate example of the GDR's stagnating and failing economy, the Trabant has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity since German reunification and has become central to the phenomenon of Ostalgie. Based on interviews, the paper also explores what the Trabant can tell us about Ostalgie - does this car simply reflect people's longing for the lost days of their youth? Or can a car really threaten the democratic order?

Who is it for? This event is suited to anyone interested in German memory and identity and particularly how objects from history affect our society today. The interdisciplinary nature of this research may interest colleagues from all disciplines

What will you gain? You will gain a key insight into the production of the Trabant and how this symbolised a failing state and a struggling society. Through the Trabant, we learn how an object can personify its culture and simultaneously be a victim of a system. Therefore, the analysis considers social theory developed by Niklas Luhmann, as well as theories proposed by Pierre Nora surrounding spatial memory.

Price Tower 204

(Parkgate Road)

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Friday 12th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:00-12:00

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Arts and Media Research Showcase
A Greatest Hits Package

This session gives an overview of some recent research in Arts and Media

Dr Simon Morrison - Psychogeography, Hauntology and Cultural Representations of Ibiza.

Jim Mason - Can Harmonic Techniques Common in UK Singles Chart Music of the 1980s be Successfully Used in Music Targeting Today's UK Singles Chart?"

Dr Mark Duffett - Cowboys and Humanists: Gene Autry and the Cowboy Code

Dr Katie Barnett - "If Ever There Was Someone to Keep Me at Home, It Would Be You”: Representing Brothers and Sisters on Screen

David Randles - From Russia with Emoji's: Digital Storytelling at the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Who is it for? University staff and students interested in finding out about research going on in the Media department.

What will you gain? A better understanding of some recent research on topics including popular music, cinema and social media.

Kingsway 104

(Kingsway)

Book  via Eventbrite

12:00-14:00

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

You can also bring your own Lunch.

Drop-in Session: REF 2021 and the draft Code of Practice-
Elizabeth Christopher, Director of Research & Knowledge Transfer and Jill Pye, REF Data Officer

Please come and join some or all of this overview of the Research Excellence Framework:

12:00 – 12:30 Introduction and overview of REF
12:30 – 13:15 Code of Practice overview and feedback
13:15 – 14:00 Q&A surgery

Who is it for? Academic and Research staff (PGR students thinking of entering academia might also find the overview useful)

What will you gain? A brief background on the REF for anyone new to it. Information about the preparations that are underway and in particular the Code of Practice – which sets out how we will determine who and what research is submitted. It will be an opportunity to ask all your REF2021 related questions.

Hollybank 002

(Parkgate Road)

Book  via Eventbrite
14:30-15:30

There’s Method in the Madness: Grasping at meaning in Phenomenological Research, Some Key Considerations
Dr Sam Elkington, Teesside University

This session is part of the Business and Management Researcher Development Hub’s public seminar series. This interactive session takes a practical look at what it means to ‘do’ phenomenology’ in social science research. In particular, the workshop will outline the experiential and theoretical basis of Descriptive Phenomenology, Phenomenological Psychology and Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis approaches. During the session we will attempt to determine where the researcher stands when reflecting upon their own experience, versus when reflecting on the experiences of others as communicated through narrative descriptions.

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture.

Bridge House 008

(Queen’s Park)

Book  via Eventbrite

*Bookings close on the 5th April

15:30-16:30

Visual communication in the 21st Century: An examination of the visual and digital communication experiences of the post-Millennial learner
Dr Kathleen L. Sillitoe, Media

Higher education (HE) visual communication students, who are considering careers in the creative industries of advertising and marketing, need a high level of skills in visual and digital literacy. However, students born after 1995 (post-Millennials), now entering HE, appear to present with fewer visual communication and digital skills than previous cohorts. This paper examines the extent to which young people are learning visual communication skills, through their use of widely available digital media technologies, in order to understand the future educational needs of post-Millennial students.

Who is it for? University Staff and Students

What will you gain? Insight into CHAT framework, digital literacy, new media technologies, post- Millennial learning habits, and visual communications.

Price Tower 204

(Parkgate Road)

Book  via Eventbrite

Monday 15th April

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:30-10:30

Impact of Financial and Cost management systems within Family Owned Businesses on the Corporate Citizenship
Dr Padmi Nagirikandalage, Analytics and Finance

This paper focuses on family businesses operating in an emerging economy as the hindrances that any family business meet may vary compared to operating in a developed economy. Since, an effective cost management system could improve the small businesses’ financial management the purpose of this paper is to critically explore the impact of financial and cost management systems on family owned businesses in terms of enhancing an effective financial management while increasing their performances in order to engage fully in the corporate citizenship agenda and sustainability as well. In particular, it aims to explore the financial and cost management system of these family owned business while examining the impact of changing dynamics and Sri Lankan cultural and local characteristics on the adoption of financial and cost management systems.

Who is it for? This is beneficial to any interested audiences - such as academics, students, businesses and professionals.

What will you gain? An understanding of how family businesses could better engage with the corporate citizenship agenda, and how research on corporate models should move to include such businesses.

Bridge House 007

(Queen’s Park)

Book  via Eventbrite
11:00-12:00

Journal Decision Making and how to Publish
Michael Davis, Wiley Publishers

Michael will be joining us to share practical advice and expert tips on publishing and the editorial

processes with Wiley and its’ various scholarly imprints.

Who is it for? All University Staff and PGR students.

What will you gain? Understanding and knowledge of the publication processes for Wiley journals.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1

(Parkgate Road)

Book  via Eventbrite

12:00-13:30

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Lunch Provided

Workshop: Research Integrity and Governance 
Elizabeth Christopher, Director of Research & Kno
wledge Transfer

The Concordat to Support Research Integrity is an important umbrella framework for promoting the highest standards of research integrity and governance in the UK. This session will explore what processes are in place at Chester to comply with this concordat, where information on legal, ethical and professional frameworks can be accessed, the training and support available to staff and students, and how the University acts within this concordat to promote and support Research Integrity and Governance.

Who is it for? Anyone involved in research (Masters students, PGR students and University staff)

What will you gain? An understanding of what research integrity is, the function of the Concordat to Support Research Integrity, and information about the structures and processes Chester has in place to support and promote Research Integrity and Governance.

Molloy 104

(Parkgate Road)

Book  via Eventbrite

Tuesday 16th April

      

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:00-10:00

Demystifying Open Access Publishing and ChesterRep
LIS Research Support Team

Looking at the importance of Open Access Publishing, funder policies and subsequent eligibility for the next REF. How to check OA conditions, how you can use your research output post publication and how ChesterRep links to OA publication policies.

Who is it for? All Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of Open Access conditions, search tools and how ChesterRep works in part of this OA process.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

Book via Eventbrite

10:00-14:30

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, and Lunch Provided

UKRO: EU Funding Advice Brexit and Beyond
Jon Brookes, UKRO

Jon Brookes, an expert in European funding, will give a series of talks about what European funding is available and how to apply.

This session will also cover the impact of Brexit on continued UK participation in EU projects such as Horizon and Erasmus, and the governments underwrite guarantee for successful projects post EU exit.

More details to follow closer to the event.

Who is it for? All Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? Expert advice on what EU funding streams are available, how best to access them, and an idea of what the future may hold.

Riverside 012

(Riverside)

Book via Eventbrite
12:00-13:00

STORYHOUSE Lunchtime Lecture Series Launch:

Minority Voices within Religion
Dr James Holt, Religious Education

What can we learn from people on the margins? Too often society and education can ignore the voices of people who find themselves in the minority. Dr James Holt, Senior Lecturer in Religious Education explores how we can expand the boundaries of the voices we take note of in education, particularly Religious Education, and help people feel included and a part of the wider conversation.

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture

Storyhouse

Chester 

Book via the Storyhouse website

15:00-16:00

UKRO: EU Funding Advice - One to One Sessions

An opportunity for a limited number of ten minute one-to-one surgeries with Jon Brookes to discuss your EU application.

Riverside 104 (Riverside) Book via Eventbrite
16:00-17:00

STORYHOUSE Lunchtime Lecture Series Launch:

The Enduring Power of Comic Strips 
Dr Simon Grennan, Art & Design

Dr Simon Grennan, Leading Research Fellow in the Faculty of Humanities, scholar of Victorian comics and acclaimed comic strip artist himself, will take you through a roller-coaster ride, sparkling with the dazzling work of comics artists from around the globe and across history, from the creator of Bash Street to the American underground comics of today, via Japan, Canada, France and many stops in between.

Who is it for? Everybody, this is a public lecture

Storyhouse

Chester 

Book via the Storyhouse website

Wednesday 17th April

            

Time

Description

Location

Booking

9:00-13:00

 

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, and Lunch Provided

Panel Session: Practice as Research 
Dr Ruth Dockwray, Associate Professor of Popular Music and Dr Tracy Piper-Wright, School of Arts and Media Research Coordinator

This panel will explore the dialogue between practice and research which characterises the research taking place in the School of Arts and Media.

There will be short papers and poster presentations on the relationship between Practice and Research (practice as research, practice led research, practice based research) with theoretical and practical examples drawn from colleagues’ research projects. There will be a presentation on undertaking and examining the practice based PhD and opportunities for discussion on key topics relating to the dialogue and tension between practice and research.

Who is it for? All Staff and PGR Students

What will you gain? An understanding of practice as research approaches in Performing Arts and Art and Design disciplines and insight into the practice based PhD.

Kingsway 133 (Kingsway) Book via Eventbrite

10:00-12:00

                          

 

 

*This session is repeated on the 10th

Workshop: Using ChesterRep
LIS Research Support Team

An overview of ChesterRep the University of Chester's institutional repository and an online platform which is designed to collate, store, and aid discoverability of research carried out at the university to the wider research community.

 

Who is it for? All Staff

What will you gain? In depth understanding of ChesterRep its purposes and processes. Understanding of how to submit your work, type, and post publication implications for your research output.

Seaborne Library

Learning Space 1 (Parkgate Road)

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14:00-16:30

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits Provided

Research in the Humanities: Engaging Students
School of Humanities, Chaired by Professor Deborah Wy
nne

This event will highlight how academics in the School of Humanities use their research expertise to enhance students’ experiences and help them engage in high quality research activities. Find out how undergraduate History students helped to create the key research questions that underpinned an AHRC funded project. Discover the ways in which Archaeology students tackle prominent themes in the fields of public archaeology at their Student Conferences. An English Literature lecturer will show how her own innovative research with online historical newspaper/ periodicals databases has helped students develop high-level research skills. Students in English Language benefit from one lecturer’s research on adjective order - find out how the lecturer’s fieldwork shaped a popular Language module. Find out how the research website developed in Modern Languages supports students of French.  Discover how the rich research culture in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies has helped students develop key skills. The afternoon will consist of a series of short talks by lecturers designed to show the important role academic research plays in enhancing students’ skills, preparing them for careers, and inspiring a new generation of thinkers.

Dr Katherine Wilson (History) The Mobility of Objects Across Boundaries 1000-1700. From the seminar, to funded research, to enhancing the student experience

Dr Tom Pickles (History) Researching the Book through Teaching: Kingship, Society, and the Church in

Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire (OUP, 2018)

Dr Amy Gray Jones and Dr Barry Taylor (Archaeology) Empowering students through practice-based teaching in Archaeology

Dr Alex Tankard (English) Engaging Students with Authentic Research Skills in Historical Newspaper

Databases

Dr Paul Flanagan, (English) Using my own research to drive students’ learning in English Language Prof. Wayne Morris (TRS) Facilitating Deaf Sign Language Users Access to Higher Education: Research Transforming Teaching Practice

Prof. Claire Griffiths (Modern Languages) Locating research at the core of our teaching in Modern

Languages.

Prof. Timo Obergoker (Modern Languages) Implementing research on Contemporary France in the level 5 curriculum for French Studies. A case study.

Who is it for? All Staff and Students

What will you gain? A wealth of examples of how research can inform and improve teaching, and how teaching can contribute to world-class research. An understanding of how students studying Humanities subjects can gain greater insight into their subject by engaging with academic research

Binks 013 1&2

(Parkgate Road)

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Thursday 18th April

      

Time

Description

Location

Booking

10:00-1:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tea, Coffee & Biscuits, and Lunch Provided

Successfully securing external funding: cross-disciplinary & multi-funder perspectives
Chaired by Professor Neville Ford

We will be closing our research festival with an exceptional session. Join us to hear unique perspectives on how a range of University Academics have successfully secured funding for their research.

Welcome by the chair Prof. Neville Ford

Prof. David Clough, Theology: What makes a successful Research Council bid?

Dr Carolina Font-Palma, Chemical Engineering: Working to secure funding from Industry Prof. Alan Finnegan, Health and Social Care: National Charities & Navigating Tenders Prof. Saphwan Al Assaf, Clinical Sciences: Project leadership and Innovate Funding.

Dr Lisa Oakley, Psychology: Finding smaller funding opportunities for your specialism.

Prof. Neville Ford: The peer-reviewer’s perspective & closing remarks

Who is it for? All Staff and interested PGR students.

What will you gain? A unique range of perspectives from academic staff on how they have secured external funding for past and future projects.

Riverside 139

(Riverside)

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Beyond the Festival

      
Events to look out for in the future

3rd Tuesday of Every Month

STORYHOUSE Lunchtime Lecture Series
Various Speakers

Storyhouse hold monthly free public lectures on a variety of themes. The lectures are usually held between 12:00pm & 1:00pm, making them an ideal lunch break! Check the Storyhouse website for what’s coming up.

May

Workshop: WAMS and Time Management
Jem Warren, Senior Project Manager & Prof. Nevile Ford, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Enhancement

This session will explore how the WAMS system works, and will be an opportunity for staff to ask questions they have

Dates & Times

TBC

Demystifying the RO1 Process 
Research and Knowledge Transfer Office & Finance

We will be hosting some training sessions aimed at research active staff and Heads of Departments which will explain the RO1 process, the financial mechanisms behind it, budget allocations, and VAT.

 

Contact

If you have any queries please contact the Research and Knowledge Transfer office

Email: researchfestival@chester.ac.uk  

Tel: 01244 511063

  Download or print the programme

  Master Programme - Research Festival 2019